# Wednesday, February 01, 2012
One measure of talent is the ability to anticipate the outcome of decisions before they are made. Consider the following quotation from The Two-Second Advantage: How We Succeed by Anticipating the Future:
Like Gretzky on ice, the most successful people in various fields make continual, accurate predictions just a little ahead of and a little better than everyone else. It is the one common denominator of almost all consistent success. Talented people don’t need to have a vision of the future ten years out or even ten days out. They need a highly probable prediction just far enough ahead to see an opening or opportunity an instant before the competition. That’s true for athletes, artists, businesspeople, or anyone in any field.... In other words, talented people have a two-second advantage.
In this context, authors Ranadivé and Maney refer to Malcolm Gladwell’s 2005 best seller titled Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking, in which Gladwell makes the case that “judgments made in two seconds are often more accurate than those made after months of analysis.” Frequently, we all get consumed with measuring talent through test scores or solely based on aptitude. But for any given field or discipline, Ranadivé and Maney argue that talent comes with thousands of hours of deliberate practice framed in a mere two seconds. Vivek Ranadivé and Kevin Maney. The Two-Second Advantage: How We Succeed by Anticipating the Future – Just Enough. Crown Business, 2011. Jeff Giampalmi Additional Information: Twitter Post: Ranadivé and Maney on the difference that 2 seconds make
Wednesday, February 01, 2012 4:18:45 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  |  Trackback
# Sunday, January 29, 2012
Loss of memory and other brain function can start as early as age 45, posing a big challenge to scientists looking for new ways to stave off dementia, researchers said on Thursday.
Sunday, January 29, 2012 4:19:59 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [2]  |  Trackback
# Wednesday, November 09, 2011
Why are cancer organizations waiting until it starts to rain before they suggest buying an umbrella?
Wednesday, November 09, 2011 12:20:42 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [2]  |  Trackback
# Friday, September 30, 2011
When the drug you need to cure a cancer is nowhere to be found. Intervention in a complex system always creates unanticipated and often undesirable outcomes.
Friday, September 30, 2011 12:32:07 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [1]  |  Trackback
# Wednesday, September 28, 2011
Intervention in a complex system always creates unanticipated and often undesirable outcomes.
Wednesday, September 28, 2011 5:08:33 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  |  Trackback
# Friday, September 09, 2011
10 minute rule for presentations - Medina
Friday, September 09, 2011 3:52:53 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  |  Trackback
# Tuesday, September 06, 2011
I am reading a fascinating booked called, Brain Rules by John Medina
Tuesday, September 06, 2011 10:24:30 AM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  |  Trackback
# Sunday, July 31, 2011
Reading the newspapers and watching the news lately would lead you to believe that screening for cancer is largely a waste of time. Yet, in the same week that NEJM published Norwegian data showing a remarkably small survival benefit of 2% associated with screening mammography, HealthDay reported a decrease in cancer incidence of almost 1% per year from 1999 to 2006 and a decrease in cancer deaths of 1.6% per year from 2001 to 2006 in the United States.
Sunday, July 31, 2011 3:37:08 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  |  Trackback
# Sunday, July 24, 2011
An ethical dilemma that faces cancer researchers working in drug development conducting early phase (I) new drug studies.
Sunday, July 24, 2011 5:16:07 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  |  Trackback
# Wednesday, June 15, 2011
Recent rules issued by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) for resident work hours have further limited the consecutive and total number of hours that medical trainees may work. These measures, originally created because of safety concerns, are intended to decrease the number of fatigue-related errors made by physicians in training. They have received broad support within the medical community.
Wednesday, June 15, 2011 5:27:44 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  |  Trackback