# Wednesday, 01 February 2012
One measure of talent is the ability to anticipate the outcome of decisions before they are made. Consider the following quotation from The Two-Second Advantage: How We Succeed by Anticipating the Future:
Like Gretzky on ice, the most successful people in various fields make continual, accurate predictions just a little ahead of and a little better than everyone else. It is the one common denominator of almost all consistent success. Talented people don’t need to have a vision of the future ten years out or even ten days out. They need a highly probable prediction just far enough ahead to see an opening or opportunity an instant before the competition. That’s true for athletes, artists, businesspeople, or anyone in any field.... In other words, talented people have a two-second advantage.
In this context, authors Ranadivé and Maney refer to Malcolm Gladwell’s 2005 best seller titled Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking, in which Gladwell makes the case that “judgments made in two seconds are often more accurate than those made after months of analysis.” Frequently, we all get consumed with measuring talent through test scores or solely based on aptitude. But for any given field or discipline, Ranadivé and Maney argue that talent comes with thousands of hours of deliberate practice framed in a mere two seconds. Vivek Ranadivé and Kevin Maney. The Two-Second Advantage: How We Succeed by Anticipating the Future – Just Enough. Crown Business, 2011. Jeff Giampalmi Additional Information: Twitter Post: Ranadivé and Maney on the difference that 2 seconds make
Wednesday, 01 February 2012 16:18:45 (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  |  Trackback
# Wednesday, 09 November 2011
Why are cancer organizations waiting until it starts to rain before they suggest buying an umbrella?
Wednesday, 09 November 2011 12:20:42 (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [2]  |  Trackback
# Friday, 30 September 2011
When the drug you need to cure a cancer is nowhere to be found. Intervention in a complex system always creates unanticipated and often undesirable outcomes.
Friday, 30 September 2011 12:32:07 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [1]  |  Trackback
# Wednesday, 28 September 2011
Intervention in a complex system always creates unanticipated and often undesirable outcomes.
Wednesday, 28 September 2011 17:08:33 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  |  Trackback
# Tuesday, 06 September 2011
I am reading a fascinating booked called, Brain Rules by John Medina
Tuesday, 06 September 2011 10:24:30 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  |  Trackback
# Sunday, 31 July 2011
Reading the newspapers and watching the news lately would lead you to believe that screening for cancer is largely a waste of time. Yet, in the same week that NEJM published Norwegian data showing a remarkably small survival benefit of 2% associated with screening mammography, HealthDay reported a decrease in cancer incidence of almost 1% per year from 1999 to 2006 and a decrease in cancer deaths of 1.6% per year from 2001 to 2006 in the United States.
Sunday, 31 July 2011 15:37:08 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  |  Trackback
# Sunday, 24 July 2011
An ethical dilemma that faces cancer researchers working in drug development conducting early phase (I) new drug studies.
Sunday, 24 July 2011 17:16:07 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  |  Trackback
# Wednesday, 15 June 2011
Recent rules issued by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) for resident work hours have further limited the consecutive and total number of hours that medical trainees may work. These measures, originally created because of safety concerns, are intended to decrease the number of fatigue-related errors made by physicians in training. They have received broad support within the medical community.
Wednesday, 15 June 2011 17:27:44 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  |  Trackback
# Wednesday, 06 April 2011
Is Community Oncology Under Attack from Within? Is the Changing of the Guard in Oncology Affecting Patient Care?
Wednesday, 06 April 2011 14:26:30 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [1]  |  Trackback
# Tuesday, 07 September 2010
A recent story published by Mike Lillis in the Healthwatch healthcare blog in The Hill, reported that a coalition of organizations is requesting that OSHA intervene and create work rules for physicians in training.
Tuesday, 07 September 2010 10:41:59 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [1]  |  Trackback
# Tuesday, 17 August 2010
Most of the time, the FDA is a valued oversight organization protecting all of us and assuring that new drugs and devices are safe and useful. Is there a point where it begins to act like big brother, attempting to limit our personal choice? Where is the line between these two extremes?
Tuesday, 17 August 2010 14:28:34 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  |  Trackback
strong argument was made for studying the relative effectiveness of screening colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy. Based on a review in JAMA of three studies conducted outside the US that showed no difference in colon cancer mortality or incidence when the two procedures were compared, the Times proposed a US study to answer this question.
Tuesday, 17 August 2010 12:31:39 (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  |  Trackback
# Monday, 08 February 2010

In a recent series of articles in the NY Times, Walt Bogdanich uncovered an alarming series of radiation treatment errors associated with implementation of new computerized treatment technologies such as IMRT. Based on this article, reporting hundreds of cases, some of them fatal, it appears that a variety of causes are associated with errors, including inadequate training of physicists and radiation therapists, difficulty physically validating computer-generated treatment plans, over-reliance on reliability of computer technology and inadequacy of traditional radiation oncology quality assurance approaches in the era of new technologies.

Monday, 08 February 2010 11:42:04 (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #    Disclaimer  |  Comments [0]  |  Trackback